Microbial Ecology

We address the urgent need to understand the composition and function of this microscopic world and their global impacts.

Microorganisms in soil, water and air represent nearly all of the biodiversity on the planet. Known collectively as Earth’s microbiome, they exert strong control over climate and biogeochemical cycles. Researching the microbial world help us better predict of the effects of land use and climate change and lays the groundwork for new environmental biotechnologies.


Click the profiles to learn more about who we are and what we research in microbial ecology.


 

  • I focus on multi-omnics analysis (genomics, proteomics, metabolomics) and plant-soil microbial feedbacks in our work on in microbial ecology.
  • Explore my other areas of research:


 


  • I focus on microbial physiology and multi-omnics analysis (genomics, proteomics, metabolomics) in our work on in microbial ecology.
  • Explore my other areas of research:



Raina M. Maier

Raina M. Maier

Professor

Professor, Bio5 Institute


Jean E. McLain

Jean E. McLain

Professor

Research Scientist

Assistant Dean, Faculty Advancement


Julie Neilson

Associate Research Professor

Director, Maier Lab

  • I focus on microbial physiology; multi-omnics analysis (genomics, proteomics, metabolomics); and plant-soil microbial feedbacks in our work on in microbial ecology.
  • Explore my other areas of research:


Ian Pepper

Ian L. Pepper

Professor

Director, UA/NSF Water and Environmental Technology (WET) Center



  • I focus on microbial physiology and multi-omnics analysis (genomics, proteomics, metabolomics) in our work on in microbial ecology.
  • Explore my other areas of research: